ONE BOX TASKS IN PRACTICE

The story of Anneke van Lier

ONE BOX TASKS IN PRACTICE

The story of Anneke van Lier

Structure and a clear beginning and end.

One-box tasks have been used for years as part of the Teacch Method. Teacch is a treatment method aimed at improving communication, independent functioning and participation level of people with autism . The aim is to enable the client to function independently as best as possible. You can read more about the Teacch method here. 

We are increasingly talking to professionals who tell us how they use Eendoostasks on a daily basis with these or other target groups. These conversations provide ideas for new task boxes and other insights into applicability.

We recently came into contact with occupational therapist Anneke van Lier. Anneke uses Eendoostasks, among other things, to help children provide structure and develop their fine motor skills. We spoke to her about her work and some Eendoos tasks that she regularly performs.

Anneke, can you introduce yourself?

I am Anneke van Lier, occupational therapist at Adelante Zorggroep. I work at the Ulingshof Child Center in Venlo. Special education (Education Group Extraordinary), care (PSW) and rehabilitation (Adelante) come together here. We work a lot with these three parties and have a varied group of children at our location.

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We recently came into contact with occupational therapist Anneke van Lier. Anneke uses Eendoostasks, among other things, to help children provide structure and develop their fine motor skills . We spoke to her about her work and some Eendoos tasks that she regularly performs.

Anneke, can you introduce yourself?

I am Anneke van Lier, occupational therapist at Adelante Zorggroep . I work at the Ulingshof Child Center in Venlo. Special education (Education Group Extraordinary), care ( PSW ) and rehabilitation (Adelante) come together here. We work a lot with these three parties and have a varied group of children at our location.

What age category are these children mainly in?

The youngest children (up to 4 years old) attend the therapeutic toddler group. Children from 4 to about 18 years old go to school. Some of these children are in classes that we call OZG (educational care groups).

What do you think the children need?

These children benefit greatly from structure, predictability and safety. Task-oriented and concentrated work is often difficult and these children need guidance and learn from tasks and tasks with a clear beginning, the same structure and a clear end.

How do the Eendoos tasks contribute to this?

Structure and a clear beginning and end are very evident in the Eendoos tasks. By offering the task boxes, the children learn to work on a task in a focused and concentrated manner and they learn when the task is finished. For example, if the container on the left is empty. At the same time, fine motor skills and cooperation between both hands are also practiced.

Structure and a clear beginning and end.

One-box tasks have been used for years as part of the Teacch Method. Teacch is a treatment method aimed at improving communication, independent functioning and participation level of people with autism . The aim is to enable the client to function independently as best as possible. You can read more about the Teacch method here. 

We are increasingly talking to professionals who tell us how they use Eendoostasks on a daily basis with these or other target groups. These conversations provide ideas for new task boxes and other insights into applicability.

We recently came into contact with occupational therapist Anneke van Lier. Anneke uses Eendoostasks, among other things, to help children provide structure and develop their fine motor skills . We spoke to her about her work and some Eendoos tasks that she regularly performs.

Anneke, can you introduce yourself?

I am Anneke van Lier, occupational therapist at Adelante Zorggroep . I work at the Ulingshof Child Center in Venlo. Special education (Education Group Extraordinary), care ( PSW ) and rehabilitation (Adelante) come together here. We work a lot with these three parties and have a varied group of children at our location.

20221208_115915-scaled.jpg

“ One-box tasks can be made from shoe boxes yourself. These are often creative solutions, but they are not hygienic, uniform, clear and sustainable. Shoe boxes cannot be washed after use and are vulnerable in terms of material. One-box tasks are made of durable plastic. They are safe, hygienic, uniform and clear. The materials have been tested and have a CE mark.”

What age category are these children mainly in?

The youngest children (up to 4 years old) attend the therapeutic toddler group. Children from 4 to about 18 years old go to school. Some of these children are in classes that we call OZG (educational care groups).

What do you think the children need?

These children benefit greatly from structure, predictability and safety. Task-oriented and concentrated work is often difficult and these children need guidance and learn from tasks and tasks with a clear beginning, the same structure and a clear end.

How do the Eendoos tasks contribute to this?

Structure and a clear beginning and end are very evident in the Eendoos tasks. By offering the task boxes , the children learn to work on a task in a focused and concentrated manner and they learn when the task is finished. For example, if the container on the left is empty. At the same time, fine motor skills and cooperation between both hands are also practiced.

You regularly use some task boxes, could you describe them and explain why you use this particular task?

Sort cards/clothespins

In this task the child must remove the clothespin from the card. This involves practicing cooperation between both hands, holding the materials, the clothespin must be squeezed to remove it from the card and then both are sorted. The child must see which material fits which hole/slot. Also when sorting, the material must be positioned properly in relation to the hole to make it ‘disappear’ into the hole, which is a bit of hand-eye coordination. Once the container is empty, the job is done.

Locktagon task

In this task the child has to take the locktagons apart and then put them in the ‘mailbox’. In this task, cooperation between both hands is practiced. With a lateral grip or two-point grip, the child grasps the locktagons and pulls them apart (force). They can then be put in the ‘mailbox’. Locktagons can be attached together in pairs, but multiple locktagons can also be attached together in a ‘row’. It is also possible to attach multiple locktagons to one ‘basic locktagon’. This requires more coordination to properly grip the locktagons and pull them loose. 

Water task

The children always enjoy the water task. It is a fairly simple task cognitively and fun as a final reward. This reward task requires a bit more motor coordination. For the other task boxes you can supported with the forearm on the table or on the box; for this task the arm must come loose from the surface to place the disk in the tube. In terms of puzzling, it is not a difficult task, but for children with motor problems it can be a challenge.

It’s fun to watch the discs flutter down. Children think it’s a shame that the discs are ‘used up’ so quickly.

Make sure that the tube is filled as full as possible with water, otherwise there is a chance that the disc will remain on the water instead of swirling down. 

You regularly use some task boxes, could you describe them and explain why you use this particular task?

Sort cards/clothespins

In this task the child must remove the clothespin from the card. This involves practicing cooperation between both hands, holding the materials, the clothespin must be squeezed to remove it from the card and then both are sorted. The child must see which material fits which hole/slot. Also when sorting, the material must be positioned properly in relation to the hole to make it ‘disappear’ into the hole, which is a bit of hand-eye coordination. Once the container is empty, the job is done.

View the One Box Task Sorting cards/clothespins here 

Locktagon task

In this task the child has to take the locktagons apart and then put them in the ‘mailbox’. In this task, cooperation between both hands is practiced. With a lateral grip or two-point grip, the child grasps the locktagons and pulls them apart (force). They can then be put in the ‘mailbox’. Locktagons can be attached together in pairs, but multiple locktagons can also be attached together in a ‘row’. It is also possible to attach multiple locktagons to one ‘basic locktagon’. This requires more coordination to properly grip the locktagons and pull them loose. 

View the Locktagon task here

Water task

The children always enjoy the water task. It is a fairly simple task cognitively and fun as a final reward. This reward task requires a bit more motor coordination. For the other task boxes you can supported with the forearm on the table or on the box; for this task the arm must come loose from the surface to place the disk in the tube. In terms of puzzling, it is not a difficult task, but for children with motor problems it can be a challenge.

It’s fun to watch the discs flutter down. Children think it’s a shame that the discs are ‘used up’ so quickly. 

View the Water Task here

If you would also like to share your story or professional opinion about Eendoostaken, we would like to get in touch with you via contact@eendoostaken.nl

ONE BOX TASKS COMMUNITY

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Do you already work with Eendoostaken and would you like to share your experiences? We would like to receive your story and/or photos. We reward the best and nicest entries with a free task box of your choice. 

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